Minimum Support Price
Govt of India has taken a number of initiatives for socio economic development of tribals and recognizing the critical importance...
About TRIFED
Tribals constitute 8.60% of the total population of the country, numbering 104.28 million (2011 Census) and cover about 15% of the...
Training
TRIFED in its endeavor to develop the marketing of minor forest produce is engaged in skill up gradation and capacity building ...
MFPNET
MFPNET is a network of stakeholders in the trade of MFPs which includes individuals, agencies, institutions etc interested in development of MFP.
Retail Marketing
TRIFED aims to improve the livelihood of the tribal communities by creating a sustainable market and create business opportunities ...

MFP Development

An important source of livelihoods for tribal people are non-wood forest products, generally termed 'Minor Forest Produce (MFP)' means all non-timber forest produce of plant origin and will include bamboo, canes, fodder, leaves, gums, waxes, dyes, resins and many forms of food including nuts, wild fruits, Honey, Lac, Tusser etc. The Minor Forest Produces provide both subsistence and cash income for people who live in or near forests. They form a major portion of their food, fruits, medicines and other consumption items and also provide cash income through sale. Minor Forest Produce (MFP) starts with the word “Minor” but is a major source of livelihood for tribals who belong to the poorest of the poor section of society. The Minor Forest Produce has significant economic and social value for the forest dwellers as an estimated 100 Million people derive their source of livelihood from the collection and marketing of Minor Forest Produce (Report of the National Committee on Forest Rights Act, 2011). The importance of Minor Forest Produces for this section of the society can be gauged from the facts that around 100 million forest dwellers depend on Minor Forest Produces for food, shelter, medicines and cash income. It is important for them for food, shelter medicines and case income beside providing critical subsistence during the lean seasons, particularly for primitive tribal groups such as hunter gatherers, and the landless. Tribals derive 20-40% of their annual income from Minor Forest Produce on which they spend major portion of their time. This activity has strong linkage to women’s financial empowerment as most of the Minor Forest Produces are collected and used/sold by women. Minor Forest Produce sector has the potential to create about 10 million workdays annually in the country.